12/01/2014

Story Orgy Presents: Urbex: City Secrets Part 1 #mmromance #storyorgy




Good morning Story Orgy Readers! Sorry to be absent so long, but I am back, and I've brought a new story with me. Are you ready to meet someone new? Here's Lester Bergman...

URBEX: City Secrets
Copyright Dec 2015 @ Lee Brazil 
Chapter One

Dec 1st - He kept very still while he waited.

He should have been working, that’s why he’d brought this pile of folders home from the office in the first place. There were plea bargains to be drafted, motions to be organized, a belligerent boss to be mollified with reams of paper to prove that Lester was doing his job, earning his paycheck from the city. Such as it was.
That was the story of his life, wasn’t it? Not quite good enough, no matter how hard he tried, moving up the career ladder too slow, not earning the big bucks like his brother in law who had his own practice, not achieving the early success that had marked his father’s career in the prosecutor’s office.
He should have followed his first inclination and ignored the route his father had laid out for him. A career as a chef sounded so good right now. He could have been a fabulous cook, creating dishes that melted in your mouth, succulent and flavorful.
Instead, he was here with a full message box and the beginnings of indigestion. All because he’d been too cowardly to say what he wanted, pursue his own dreams. Now here he was at thirty-six, following someone else’s dreams, drowning in paperwork and tedious, nauseating wickedness. He didn’t even get the really interesting cases. No robbery, homicide or rape cases for Lester. No. He got speeding tickets, jaywalking, shoplifting and all sorts of bull shit to remind him just how petty the justice system...and people in general were.
Tipping his chair back, Les closed his eyes and breathed deeply. Clearing his mind wasn’t easy, not when he had messages from his family on his voicemail. One from Lionel, six from Lisa, one from Aunt Izzy and one from cousin Del.
He had to drag out the heavy guns...the moon, bright and clear like a newly minted shiny silver dime in a field of dark obsidian, the air crisp and cold, a pristine blanket of snow, and the dark shadows of a battered old building…
Ideal.
Beautiful.
Abandoned.
Holding within its shaky walls the secrets of the past, the hopes, dreams, and lives of people who’d long since left the earthly plane. The image calmed him, reminded him that at its core humanity was worth so much more than he saw in his everyday life. More than moral corruption, petty villainy and directionless anger.
Deliberately, he added himself into the picture, a small figure standing on the front porch of the old farmhouse.  Pictured himself walking inside, looking up the staircase, through a caved in roof, at a twinkling star.
Lester opened his eyes and picked up the phone. He’d call Lionel first, see if he knew what had Lisa’s panties in a bunch. Del and Aunt Izzy he’d save for after Lisa… sandwiching his call to his annoying sister in between calls to people he loved might just make it easy to take her condescending bull shit.
Rising from his favorite recliner, Les crossed to the sliding glass doors of his balcony and stepped out. It wasn’t fresh, clean air, and the night outside was filled with the noise of city life...car horns and voices raised in anger,  an irrepressible, ever-present annoying hum of life that he couldn’t escape, even here on the third floor.
Staring down at the brilliant neon lights, he thumbed his phone and waited for his brother to pick up. Fumes reached his nose, and he wrinkled it in disgust.
Lionel picked up on the fourth ring, slightly out of breath, voice ragged and husky. “”Yeah?”
“Is this a bad time?” A faint smile chased Les’s gloom away. It sounded like Lionel had had a very good night… “You got company?”
A short laugh, good humored, a just the slightest bit self-mocking came back at him. “Yeah, no. I wish. I haven’t had that kind of company since… I don’t even want to think about it.”
A sympathetic sigh lifted Les’s chest. “Tell me about it. Rather, don’t because I am living it right there with you. Except… It’s not just not having time to hit up the bars and find someone for a night.”
“There’s nothing satisfying in a hook up anymore.” Lionel continued for him. “I know. I don’t know when it happened, but somehow…”
“Sex just isn’t enough anymore.” Les finished. They were silent for a minute. “So I end up working too much and you… You’re what? Working out?”
“Bite your tongue. I just carried in the groceries and the elevator is out, again.”
“I’d think that was a complaint, but I know how much you love that old building.” Unlike Les, who lived in a modern, soulless complex, Lionel had scored a terrific apartment in a century old building with fabulous original architectural findings, intricate hand carved wood work, built in cabinetry, and a not so reliable old elevator.
“No, no complaints. What can I do for you?”
“Returning your call, actually, but do you happen to know why Lisa called six times today?”
Muffled noises, doors slamming and a faint humming came over the wire. “My gut instinct is parking tickets. You know how she thinks that BMW gives her a license to park where she wants. But...Can’t say for sure, because I haven’t heard from her. But…”
Lionel drew the last word out teasingly, and Les felt a stirring of interest. He recognized that tone… the excitement in his brother’s voice. “Yes?” He kept very still while he waited.
“I’ve got the perfect place for Friday night.”
“Tell me.” The disappointment of the bar scene, the stress of a job he hated, the annoyance of a sibling who refused to deal with her own shit all vanished.
“It’s too small for a whole crew…”
“We don’t need them.” Les muttered.

“Only about thirty miles from here. Closer to you…”

To Be Continued 

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