1/27/2012

Welcome DC Juris!


Lap of Luxury by DC Juris

Hi there, everyone! My name's DC Juris, and I'll be your guest blogger today. Don't worry—I don't bite. Unless you ask nicely! ::wink::

For those of you who don't know me, I'm a transgender guy who writes GLBTQ and heterosexual romance—typically fantasy and contemporary.

I'm one of those writers who has an Evil Day Job. I work at a small veterinary clinic, which is home to three doctors, two technicians, one front desk supervisor, three receptionists, myself, and two cats. We have almost four thousand clients—I know this because I just did a mass mailing to them. We've got clients from all walks of life: older people, young people, people with money and people with very little to their names.

The thing about a veterinary clinic is that people are usually there for a while; half an hour at the least. So, you overhear some interesting conversations. One I heard the other day was two clients discussing one of their neighbors, and how the man seems to live in excess. They talked about things like heated flooring in his garage, eating out all the time, having two cars when he's only one person, etc. They kept using the word "luxury"—used it about seven times, from what I recall. The thing I found funny was that none of what they mentioned was anything I'd consider luxury. Which got me thinking…what do I consider luxury?

To me, luxury is all about the small things. The reason for this, you see, is that growing up we never had the small things. When I was a child, I thought of luxuries in terms of things most other people took for granted. Hot running water in the bathroom, a flushing toilet, a stove with more than one working burner, an oven bigger than a toaster oven, heat, a roof that didn't leak. Those things seemed like far-flung fantasies.

I probably don't have to say that I got out of that situation as soon as I possibly could. I've spent the past ten or so years of my life working my rosy little buns off in order to make my life better—make it what I want—and to be financially sound. But I'll bet I still define luxury a little differently than most. Nowadays, luxury means cocoa anytime I want it, being able to afford fresh fruits and vegetables, being able to buy my husband whatever Christmas gifts he wants, being able to go to a grocery store and just buy what I want and not have to worry about the cost. Luxury is sirloin beef instead of the cheaper stuff. Luxury is Yoplait® Yogurt, Lipton® Tea, and Jiffy® Peanut Butter—all the brand names I loved at other people's houses when I was a kid.

But above all else, luxury means ease and comfort to my life for once. I don't go to bed hungry, or too hot or too cold. I don't go to bed afraid of what will happen in the night. And I know what you're thinking—these things are all just common things. Nothing fancy about them. But for me, it's luxury.

What about you? What luxuries do you have—or wish you had—in your life?

Leave a comment below, and one lucky winner will receive the luxury of this lovely DC Juris Cover Art desk 2012 calendar! I'll end the drawing tomorrow at 11:59 PM!


GOOD LUCK!!!

14 comments:

  1. Funny how different one's perspectives can be. I had all the things you didn't as a child. But for me, it would have been a luxury to have a parent who said "I love you" or gave you a hug or wondered where you were after school, a parent who wasn't too hung over to make breakfast. So luxuries are relative. Now I have all the luxury I could ever want and a wonderful family that loves me. It does get better.

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  2. luxury is being able to spend full days with my teenage kids who normally want to be left alone to their friends, their games and their own lives. by the end of those times I get I have usually laughed until it hurt and wished for more time.

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  3. Luxury for me is to be happy, content. Material things are grand, but if you are miserable, lonely and unhappy, they don't mean much. At least to me. As Jean put it, I'm still waiting for it to get better. Great post DC!!

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  4. Luxury...hmmmm...I agree with Jean - it's a relative term…but when my teenager gives me a kiss in front of her friends...or my youngest wants me to brush and piggy tail her hair...yeah - that's kinda luxurious to me...*blushes*...well that and a good foot rub *winks*

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  5. I'm extremely lucky to have a family that loves me very much, so luxury for me has been getting my own clothes instead of what was given by family friends as hand me downs.

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  6. Luxury is the morning I just spent with my husband. Kids off to work. Sitting in front of the fire. Coffee in hand. Music playing. Sun streaming through the windows. Sharing sweet little kisses as we make plans for the coming summer.
    It's also these ten minutes I have before rushing off to work. :)

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  7. Hi everyone! Really thoughtful answers! Love it!

    Let's see...

    Jean - It's awesome that you have a family now. Like yours, my parents kinda "checked-out" of my life. I guess I preferred it that way, because neither of them were very nice people. They were both abusive, so hearing them say "I love you" would've really angered me, because yeah...clearly they didn't.

    Nanette - I went through that phase with both my kids. LOL Their two dads just weren't cool. Now one of them spends a ton of time with us. It's funny how they come back around.

    CR - Ain't that the truth! I know people who have tons, and tons of "stuff" but they're just miserable. It's sad, really.

    Havan - I can't recall the last foot rub I had! ::raises eyebrow:: I shall have to remedy this!

    J Steel - Oh yeah! I remember the first time I went to a store and bought my very own clothes - not hand me downs or things from the Salvation Army. Real, brand-spanking new clothes! So awesome!

    Dianne - Time seems to be the most valuable commodity these days, doesn't it? I know I'm always doing 18 things at once, and thinking about another 100. It's rare we get to just stop and be.

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  8. my luxuries wer about like yours!! My husband now still comments that when we were dating i showed him a drawer- in it was a can of international flavored instant coffee the name brand and a couple kinds of cocoa and tea- they weere very treasured- my mother would buy me one since i couldnt afford-it now i have two large drawers full and they still are my luxery just happy i acna have them on my own now!!

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  9. How fascinating. I've read two posts this morning and both speak of something we all want, need, and actively seek from the moment we're born. Well, one of them at any rate. Love. And now Luxury. In both instances, I'd have to agree with everyone that love is relative to you, the moment, your past. It incorporates you're experiences to the point that there is no one true meaning.

    Love and Luxury meant one thing to me as a child. We lived in a walk-up in the ghetto. We frequently went without heat and hot water so luxury for us was heat and running hot water. As a teenager, we had those things and I swore I'd never go through that again so I've been working since I was 16 to make sure I never went without heat or hot running water or the occasional meal; once my mom's foodstamps were stolen and we had to go to a relatives for lunch.

    Now? Luxuries are once again the little things. A cool breeze caressing my skin. Hearing about someone overcome a challenge. All the moments I have with my partner. And last, but not least, working while my pugs gather in a pile around me.

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  10. I moved to Hawaii three months ago - with only three suitcases and my dog - so I don't have much in the way of luxuries. What I do have is living in Hawaii. I live on the Windward (east) side of Oahu with the lush, green mountains to my left and the crystal clear blue ocean to my right. I work in Waikiki where I go to the beach for lunch every day just to feel the sun on my face and the sand in my toes. And to watch the surfers. ;-) No, I don't have much in the way of monetary luxuries but what I do have is much better. I live in Paradise.

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  11. I live right near you Marissa, and I agree we have all the luxury I need in Paradise without the need for monetary luxury! All I need is hubby, kids, sand, book, writing! Mahalo, DC

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  12. hmmm, like many for me, luxury has changed over time...right now, I enjoy that fact that if I want to go out for dinner on a given night of the week I can afford it...i'm not living on ramen noodles and stuff like I did when I first got out in the work force. I like that if I want a book I can buy it (although I do try to control my one-click addiction)

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  13. More comments! Awesome! You guys are making it hard to pick just one winner!

    Cathy - Isn't it nice to be able to have that kind of stuff?!

    Johnny - I know what you mean about heat and hot running water. When I was a kid, we didn't have hot running until my grandmother died - she left my mother some money and one of the things mom got was a hot water heater. I was sooo nice not to have to heat up kettles on the stove anymore! Very luxurious back then!!

    Marissa & Rebecca - WOW. That does sound like paradise! I'd say you both have a TON of luxury! Who needs money when you have nature?

    Dee - I know what you mean. Food is such a simple thing...until you can't afford it. Hubby and I are finally financially stable, after a really, really long haul, and it's nice to be able to say "lets go out for dinner!" and not have to worry about how we're going to pay for it!

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  14. And the winner is.....Cathy Brockman!! :-) ::throws confetti:: Congratulations! If you'll send me your snail mail (USPS mail) address to dcjuris@stny.rr.com, I'll send your calendar out via Fed Ex on Monday!

    Thanks to everyone who entered/commented!!! :-D

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To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting. ~e.e. cummings, 1955